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How tree trunks are cut to produce lumber with different shapes, grains, and uses

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Trees Wood Cut

At ArchDaily, José Tomás Franco walks us through the cut patterns that are most used to saw wood into different shapes & sizes.

The lumber we use to build is extracted from the trunks of more than 2000 tree species worldwide, each with different densities and humidity levels. In addition to these factors, the way in which the trunk is cut establishes the functionality and final characteristics of each wood section. Let’s review the most-used cuts.

Each cut pattern produces wood with grain patterns and composition that makes it more or less suited to particular uses. For instance, the “interlocked cut” produces thin boards that are “quite resistant to deformation”.

Trees Wood Cut Example

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mgeraci
166 days ago
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New York, NY
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Yemen 2017Visualizing the complex political dimensions of the...

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Yemen 2017

Visualizing the complex political dimensions of the devastating civil war in Yemen using z-fighting artifacts to render different combinations of flags from the 15 (at the time of writing) nations, governments, and political organizations involved in the continuing armed conflict.

(BBC Reporting)

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mgeraci
379 days ago
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New York, NY
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Yemen 2017Visualizing the complex political dimensions of the...

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Yemen 2017

Visualizing the complex political dimensions of the devastating civil war in Yemen using z-fighting artifacts to render different combinations of flags from the 15 (at the time of writing) nations, governments, and political organizations involved in the continuing armed conflict.

(BBC Reporting)

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mgeraci
380 days ago
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New York, NY
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The Mountain Shepherds of Tusheti (31 photos)

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Every autumn, a spectacular animal migration takes place in Georgia’s Tusheti region, in the northern Caucasus Mountains. Photographer Amos Chapple recently joined a group of shepherds and their dogs on this treacherous, boozy, three-day journey from the steep mountains to the plains, as they brought their 1,200 sheep down to their winter pastures.

Crossing the formidable 9,190 ft (2,800 m) high Abano Pass. The morning is spent winding through the alpine lakes and watching for the rocks that occasionally clatter down the cliffs. (© Copyright Amos Chapple / Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty)
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mgeraci
404 days ago
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New York, NY
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Hide Under The Bakery Day!

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You're hiding in the basement under the bakery for the next few hours until things calm down. The baker already saw you down there when he came down for a sack of flour. He nodded in your direction, then he went back upstairs.

Next time he comes down, he leaves a loaf of bread and a pat of butter and some water and you eat. You were starved. You didn't know you'd have to hide today so you didn't get to eat first. You also didn't get to go to the bathroom.

"Bathroom top of the stairs," is the first thing the baker says to you when he comes down an hour later. He heads upstairs leaving the door open for you. You assume it's safe for you to show yourself above ground. If the baker wanted to hand you over he could just go ahead and do that, so going upstairs shouldn't put you in any more danger than you're already in. You head up and the bathroom's right outside the basement door, to the right.

When you head back downstairs there's a plate of cookies waiting for you. Another glass of water. Also a rolled up apron placed as a pillow at the head of a sack of flour. You eat the cookies then lay down and you sleep.

When you wake the baker is standing over you. "Now or never," he says and he leads you upstairs and out the door where you see it's just before dawn. You climb into the back of his van, into the space he's made between cake box flats and sacks of flour. He moves a couple laundry sacks of dirty aprons over you to block you from any curious eyes then you lay still while he drives to the people who'll keep you safe.

Happy Hide Under The Bakery Day!
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mgeraci
653 days ago
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New York, NY
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Furniture Design History: Why Do Wingback Chairs Have Wings?

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If form follows function, then to the modern-day observer, the design of wingback chairs does not appear to make sense. Why add structure to, and upholster, the sides of a chair above the armrest? The sitter needs no lateral support and is not likely to even contact the wings in regular use.

The answer has to do with climate control, or more precisely the lack of it, in 1600s Britain, where this chair style was first invented. Lacking weatherstripping, caulk and triple-glazed windows, houses and buildings of the time were drafty affairs. The wingback chair was designed to be sat in front of the dominant heating method of the time, fireplaces, while the wings on the side prevented drafts from slicing through your little cocoon of warmth. The pronounced protrusion of the wingtips was to keep the breeze off of your ears and neck.

The earliest versions were made completely of wood, and upholstery was sparse.

Even when the chairs first did become fully upholstered, it was more springs and horsehair than plush polyurethane foam, as you can see in this cutaway.

Nowadays wingback chairs can be had in all manner of garish patterns, and with stuffing up the yin-yang…

...or in versions where the materials choice makes no sense given the original context.

To my eye, the classic leather ones look best.

In any case, now you can see that Arne Jacobsen's egg chair, when it came out in 1958, must've looked like the new VW Bug of its day: A modernized nod to the past.


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mgeraci
718 days ago
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New York, NY
samuel
718 days ago
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The Haight in San Francisco
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satadru
718 days ago
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TIL...
New York, NY
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